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We also consider other English language qualifications. If your score is below our requirements, you may be eligible for one of our pre-sessional English language programmes. You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below. The module involves the negotiation, design and delivery of a research project whose precise topic will be determined by the student and the project supervisor.

The dissertation will be 20, words in length and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to consolidate their existing knowledge and skills base while developing new knowledge and skills made possible by its project-orientated nature. Diplomacy and Foreign Policy are central to the understanding of international politics.

The structure of the international system induces a constant need for political dialogue and negotiations. Besides war, diplomacy is the common language states are using to interact on the world stage. Complementing the first core module on Diplomacy and Foreign Policy which provides theoretical understanding of the subject, this module applies these theoretical tools to contemporary diplomatic and negotiation issues and great power politics PPR. Indeed, the teaching and learning strategy of Diplomacy and Foreign Policy is designed to give students both theoretical and practical understanding of contemporary issues in diplomacy and foreign policy.

Academic teaching will thus be complemented by lectures diplomats, civil servants, etc. Select Bibliography: L. Butler, International Conflict Management, Routledge, Larsen and J. Lesage et al. Speth and P. Heywood, Global Politics, Palgrave, This module introduces students to ways of conceptualizing diplomacy and foreign policy in the 21st century:. The teaching and learning strategy of Diplomacy and Foreign Policy is designed to give students both theoretical and practical understanding of contemporary issues in diplomacy and foreign policy.

Academic teaching will be complemented by lectures and in-class activities carried out by practitioners diplomats, civil servants, etc. Select Bibliography: R. Barston, Modern Diplomacy, Longman, Berridge, Diplomacy: Theory and Practice, Palgrave, Smith et al. Muldoon et al. This module serves to consolidate postgraduate research and learning support by enabling students to engage with theories, methods, and skills of direct relevance to their studies. The module is core for all PPR PGT politics students and complements core subject and discipline-specific provision in religious studies and philosophy.

The first part of the module examines the principles of research, including different disciplinary traditions of knowledge production. It goes on to set out the process of structuring a research project and explores how to develop and apply theory. The second part of the module examines a range of methods for conducting research, including interviews, surveys, and case studies.

The final section covers questions of ethics and goes through how to write up and present research. Through the module, students will design research projects, develop writing and critical evaluation skills, and have the opportunity to present their research ideas as part of the annual MA conference. The module involves a combination of lectures, small group discussion, and presentations covering the following areas:. Creswell, J.

Thousand Oaks: Sage. The course aims to explore a variety of approaches to conflict management in contemporary conflicts, by third parties and parties in conflict, and critically assesses their effectiveness and potential. The course draws its theoretical foundations from peace and conflict research but is aimed at enabling students to learn to assess the scope for conflict management and peace-building in practice. The module includes both academic literature as well as policy relevant papers. The focus of the course is on analysing peace processes and practical problems of conflict prevention, conflict management and peace-building in a range of contemporary international, internal, ethnic, community and environmental conflicts.

Students will be divided up into groups of two or three, and each group will take responsibility for identifying and investigating a specific approach to conflict management in a conflict of their choice. The choice of cases will vary with the interest of students. Barash, David P. Kaldor, M. Afghanistan: The Labyrinth of Violence Polity, Misra A. This course introduces students to the historical and contemporary making of the 'Third World' the global South with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and South Asia. It is divided into two parts.

‘The Pope’s own hand outstretched’: Holy See diplomacy as a hybrid mode of diplomatic agency

The first half explores historical processes, beginning with the creation of an international capitalist economy and its incorporation of the global South from the sixteenth century onwards and ends with an examination of neo-liberalism and the post-Washington consensus with its emphasis on poverty reduction and the UN Millennium Development Goals MDGs. The second half explores key contemporary development policies, debates and actors such as foreign aid and international NGOs; diaspora politics and remittances; grassroots social movements; and the role of China in fostering a renewed focus on resource-based models of development including reformist, redistributive models as in Venezuela and Ecuador.

The course objective is thus to equip students to critically appraise the complex interactions between Northern and Southern state and non-state actors in shaping current development policy and resistance to it. Eller, S. Hoogvelt, A. Livingstone, G. Globalisation has become a buzzword in the social sciences and lay discourse. It is often related to the speeding up of global communication and travel, and the transnationalisation of economic, political, social and cultural institutions. The meaning and causes of globalisation are highly debatable. For the purposes of this module globalisation is defined as a complex, paradoxical set of processes, which are multi-scalar, multi-temporal, multi-centric, multi-form, and multi-causal.

It produces fragmentation and integration, divergence and convergence as well as continuities and discontinuities. Their overall effect is to reconfigure asymmetries of power and knowledge and this in turn raises questions about governance, inequalities, and resistance in and across different parts of the world. Selected themes range from MacDonaldization through to Wal-Martization and the current financial crisis.

The course is taught on the basis of ten weekly two-hour seminars with short lectures, a min. The topics include: the world market, finance and production, labour and migration, global cities, global media and global culture, sovereignty and nation-states, global governance, global cities as well as financial globalization and crisis. Bauman, Z. Globalization and the Nation-State 2nd edition Panitch, L. Tutorial rather than lecture or seminar based, this module provides opportunity to undertake a concentrated and focussed study of a topic, theme or subject which is of interest to the student and for which appropriate supervisory coverage and academic resourcing are available.

Student learning is facilitated by five hours of tutorial support. This module aims to provide students with a broad understanding of the main areas of study within the field of international relations IR. The introductory session addresses the general question as to what constitutes the study of IR. Subsequent sessions examine the major approaches to the discipline both mainstream and critical , focusing upon the distinctive insights and analyses that they have brought to bear. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the nature of the wide-ranging theoretical debates that have shaped the discipline and will develop an understanding of the importance of questions of theory to the way in which we study IR.

More particularly, students will be able:.

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Scott Burchill et al. Tim Dunne et al. This course familiarises you with the major issues in the politics and international relations of the contemporary Middle East region. The countries covered include all Arab states and non-Arab states such as Iran and Israel. Deliberately, the course will start with a hard look at the contemporary picture in the region and, from that, ask the questions about how we got there.

Digging back will include a broad introduction to the people, society, history and politics of the Middle East. The course will then explore the interplay of factors such as religion, ethnicity, gender and class in the politics of the region; the role played by internal and external actors; issues of conflict in the region; political economies; foreign policies of major states and the perception of what those policies might be; regional integration; the concepts of political Islam and the challenge of democracy and Islam.

The aim of the course is not in the first place to cover in detail all of the most recent events, and it will be assumed that you follow current affairs in the region. Rather, the aim is to undertake a deeper exploration of the region: to help you understand and analyse the dynamics involved in these events and processes.


  • The Archaean: Geological and Geochemical Windows into the Early Earth.
  • Concepts in Calculus I.
  • ‘The Pope’s own hand outstretched’: Holy See diplomacy as a hybrid mode of diplomatic agency.
  • Robert Weiner and Paul Sharp.

In other words: why did things evolve the way they did, why are they what they appear to be today, and what does this tell us about where they are likely to go in the future? This will be done through guided reading, seminar discussion, and your own research and writing. The concept of spirituality is a powerful analytic tool when it comes to the examination of various binaries in Western culture: the sacred and the secular, society and the individual, authority and the subject, the this-worldly and the other-worldly.

In some instances, 'spirituality' as a form of life emphasizes the shift in importance from one to the other elements of binary sets from institutional authority to the subject ; in others, it even challenges the binary between this- and other-worldly concerns.

This module seeks to bring the insights and disciplines of Asian and other studies to bear on the theories that arose in Western contexts. In this way, a richer, global understanding of paradigms, trends and presuppositions can emerge in the study of spirituality and its relationship to religion, society, secularism, modernity and other conceptual categories.

The module will look at experiences of Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist and Shinto amongst other traditions in order to query the binaries mentioned above in very different, complementary and sometimes incompatible ways relative to those familiar to the Western, post- Christian experience. There will be weeks given over to student presentations and discussions.

Upon successful completion of the module, the student will have gained knowledge of the relevance of the concept of 'spirituality' in Asian religious and cultural traditions; explored various theoretical and empirical strategies in the study of Asian spiritualities; and learnt to study spirituality in Asian traditions in terms suited to and derived from their native contexts. Alter, Joseph.

Princeton: PUP. Davdal, Sonal ed. Pintchman, Tracy.

Diplomacy and Foreign Policy MA | Lancaster University

The rise of the Goddess in the Hindu tradition. Select Bibliography: L. Butler, International Conflict Management, Routledge, Larsen and J. Lesage et al. Speth and P. Heywood, Global Politics, Palgrave, This module introduces students to ways of conceptualizing diplomacy and foreign policy in the 21st century:.

The teaching and learning strategy of Diplomacy and Foreign Policy is designed to give students both theoretical and practical understanding of contemporary issues in diplomacy and foreign policy. Academic teaching will be complemented by lectures and in-class activities carried out by practitioners diplomats, civil servants, etc.

Select Bibliography: R. Barston, Modern Diplomacy, Longman, Berridge, Diplomacy: Theory and Practice, Palgrave, Smith et al. Muldoon et al.