Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online From the Earth to the Moon (Extraordinary Voyages, Book 4) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with From the Earth to the Moon (Extraordinary Voyages, Book 4) book. Happy reading From the Earth to the Moon (Extraordinary Voyages, Book 4) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF From the Earth to the Moon (Extraordinary Voyages, Book 4) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF From the Earth to the Moon (Extraordinary Voyages, Book 4) Pocket Guide.
Series by cover

Here the Moon is no more than a backdrop, the real focus is on a courtroom upon the Moon. An entrepreneur wants to turn Jupiter into a mini-Sun in order to terraform the moons and relieve the population pressure on Earth. But another corporation wants to stop him, so they have him charged before a blatantly corrupt lunar court. The question is: what can the psi-powered defence lawyer do to save the entrepreneur's life? Lunar Justice is hardly Harness at his best, but he can still write genuinely convincing and moving human relationships, moreover, it's not often you see the Moon as a setting for comic science fiction, which is an excellent reason why this is on the list.

Jules Verne Book List - FictionDB

John Gribbin and Marcus Chown are two highly respected science writers who occasionally turn their talents, and their expertise, to science fiction. So you know that what you are going to encounter here has been rigorously worked out. These two novels are set in the same future, but 1, years apart. In Double Planet, a comet is on a collision course with Earth. While a team of astronauts prepares a mission to try and divert the comet, another team of scientists embark on a desperate plan to make the Moon habitable as a refuge for survivors. In the sequel, Reunion, the lunar colony is facing a new threat as the atmosphere begins to fail: the only solution may lie back on Earth.

If you like your science fiction really hard, and the science really feasible, you really can't do much better than Gribbin and Chown. For the last 30 years, Ben Bova has been composing an intricately interconnected sequence of novels that explore the human colonisation of the entire solar system. Inevitably, the Moon plays a key role in that story, and it is at the centre of two novels collectively known as the Moonbase Saga.

In the first of the novels, Moonrise, Moonbase is a failing colony, losing money and in imminent danger of being closed down. But when an astronaut dreams of establishing a new, sustainable colony on the Moon he faces unexpected opposition. By the second novel, Moonwar, the new Moonbase is the last redoubt for research into nanotechnology, which has been banned on Earth. When the Earth sends soldiers to shut the research down, a new kind of war develops.

Top 25 Best Science Fiction Books About the Moon

Exciting as the idea of a human colony on the Moon might be, in the long term it can only ever be a springboard to the rest of the solar system, and within the sequence of novels that make up Bova's Grand Tour, the Moon is firmly located within that context. Like Stephen Baxter, Johnson imagines that the Apollo programme continued. In this case, Apollo 19 arrives at a point on the Moon where ice has been detected, but when it comes time to leave, the ascent engine fails to fire and the two crew members find themselves marooned on the Moon.

Setting out to explore as much as possible before their resources are exhausted, they chance upon an ancient, abandoned lunar base whose humanoid crew all died violently. Exploring the base, they realise that the base was established by humans from Earth before Noah's Flood, which the NASA commander interprets as a message from God.

This is science fiction as Christian propaganda, but it is an interesting example of the type and illustrates yet another way in which the Moon plays upon our imagination. This is yet another novel with the Moon as threat, and another which plays with the idea of the dark side of the Moon.

In this instance a superweapon is being constructed on the farside of the Moon, a weapon which would give absolute mastery of the solar system. Except it's not a weapon to start with. A geologist from the Moon finds himself in the middle of a major political battle when he reveals that an asteroid that has been captured for mining could be a major threat to the earth. His views are taken up by a fanatical fringe group, while the corporations intent on mining the asteroid are after his blood.

But on the farside of the Moon he finds an automatic factory building a massive communications laser that he realises could be repurposed.

Featured categories

In many ways this is a quite simplistic adventure story, and Allen certainly has a flair for the melodramatic. But at the same time he provides some intriguing and often amusing insights into the nature of lunar society. Defoe, author of Robinson Crusoe and Journal of the Plague Year among many others, is not generally recognised for his science fiction, but in fact he wrote one of the most peculiar of early voyages to the Moon.

The vehicle is a winged chariot powered by fuel and fire in a manner that makes it sound strangely like a combustion engine of some sort, but the fact that the number of feathers on the wings matched the number of seats in parliament demonstrates that the whole thing is meant more satirically than scientifically. Once on the Moon the traveller discovers a host of marvels, ranging from a seat that can read thoughts to a glass through which could be observed all the happenings back on Earth.

But what we really get is a rather vicious satire on the Royal Society all learned men are described as idiots that is similar in many ways to the flying island of Laputa in Swift's Gulliver's Travels which came out some 20 years later. Defoe was something of a rabble rouser, notorious for his controversial conservative ideas, and he would use the Moon as a platform from which to lash out at what he saw as the idiocies of his day not just in this novel but in a whole series of pamphlets and essays written around the same time. This is an important, if now little known, episode in the history of Moon literature.

Elsewhere in this list we have seen the Moon as both a threat and a refuge, but it is also used as a symbol of difference, not just the political difference in The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, but a physical and psychological difference. The Gods Themselves tells of the relationship between the Earth and a parallel universe, one that could, unknowingly, be disastrous for both.


  1. Get your Space Race knowledge up to speed with these books.;
  2. Extraordinary Voyages.
  3. Related Articles!
  4. Advanced Surveillance!
  5. Andrew Chaikin;
  6. Hardback Editions.

In the final third of the novel the scene shifts to the Moon, where people have developed a very different physique from those on earth. They would take the differences even further if genetic engineering had not been banned. This signifies how far they have diverged from familiar humanity, and at one point in the novel they even contemplate taking the Moon out of earth orbit and even further away from our planet. The Gods Themselves was Asimov's favourite among his novels, and also probably one of the best.

The way it demonstrates the growing difference between people of the Earth and people of the Moon is one of the more telling moments in Moon fiction. There are some Adam Roberts, for example who argue that this is the first work of science fiction, though there are many other contenders for that title. Published posthumously only a few years before Godwin's The Man in the Moone, which was also posthumous, it takes the form of a fantasy that incorporates many of Kepler's ideas about astronomy.


  1. Romanian-Finnish Seminar on Complex Analysis: Proceedings, Bucharest, Romania, June 27–July 2, 1976!
  2. From the Earth to the Moon | novel by Verne | louastilagew.tk?
  3. The Fantastic Worlds of Jules Verne?
  4. Gypsy Boy: My Life in the Secret World of the Romany Gypsies.
  5. Jules Verne manuscripts / ATV / Human and Robotic Exploration / Our Activities / ESA.
  6. Series: Les voyages extraordinaires;
  7. Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid.

Kepler recounts a long, complicated dream in which daemons transport people to "the island of Levania" their name for the Moon , a journey which involves extreme cold, shortage of air, and the need to accelerate away from Earth and then, once the Lagrange point is passed, to decelerate towards the Moon. Once on Levania, the traveller learns lots of scientific details, such as how an eclipse would look from the Moon and the relative sizes of the planets.

Whether or not one agrees with Adam Roberts, there is no doubting the importance of this narrative in the early history of science fiction. Why it tops the list: This Hugo winning novel is quite simply the most vivid and memorable account of life on the Lunar colony that science fiction has produced. Similar Recommendations Click to view. Listiverse Recommendations Click to View. Comments 0.

Series by cover

Upgrade Dima Zales. Why it's on the list: This is one of the most profound of all Cold War thrillers, in which death is the price of discovery. Why it's on the list: This was the first work of any sort to imagine a mechanical means of conveyance to the Moon. Why it's on the list: Our knowledge of the Moon has changed quite a bit in the half a century or so since this was written, but it remains a vivid example of how sf writers of the golden age were true to then scientific knowledge about the reality of life on the Moon.

Jules Verne. Why it's on the list: Leaving aside the notion of using a cannon to fire a projectile at the Moon, this was one of the most scientifically accurate of the early Moon voyages, and in many ways anticipated the actual nature of the NASA missions a hundred years later. Why it's on the list: Like all too many of Baxter's novels, this is a story that ends with the destruction of the Earth; but it creates an unusual mixture of Moon novel and disaster novel that is terrifyingly convincing in its detail.

Why it's on the list: Between the last manned mission to the Moon and the renewed technological interest in a lunar colony that we are beginning to see in the 21st century, the Moon tended to be of interest less for realistic accounts of life on the Moon than as a setting for satire. Why it's on the list: Since his death, Shaw's work has probably not had the recognition it deserves, perhaps because he tended to work on a small canvas where the major effects were emotional rather than spectacular.

John W. Campbell Jr. Why it's on the list: With his precise attention to technical details, Campbell set the scene for the lunar stories to come throughout the Golden Age. Why it's on the list: It's only surprising there aren't more crime stories set on the Moon: solving the crime really is an excellent way of solving the puzzle of what it's like on the Moon.

Edgar Rice Burroughs. Why it's on the list: The Moon shouldn't just be a place of technological challenges, it should be associated with wild adventure also. Why it's on the list: McDevitt has always been an accomplished writer of stories about people facing massive and complex decisions, and as the focus of this novel shifts between the Earth and the Moon the decisions don't come much more massive, or more complex.

Why it's on the list: This is a tightly written and very effective short novel, but Simak still finds the space to include lots of fascinating incidental detail about life in the lunar outback. Why it's on the list: This is the sort of hard sf that Swanwick produced effortlessly at the start of his career, and though short this is a gripping and acute picture of life on the Moon.

Why it's on the list: It's a bit of a stretch, but Arthur C. Why it's on the list: Lunar Justice is hardly Harness at his best, but he can still write genuinely convincing and moving human relationships, moreover, it's not often you see the Moon as a setting for comic science fiction, which is an excellent reason why this is on the list.

Search Google Appliance

Why it's on the list: If you like your science fiction really hard, and the science really feasible, you really can't do much better than Gribbin and Chown. Why it's on the list: Exciting as the idea of a human colony on the Moon might be, in the long term it can only ever be a springboard to the rest of the solar system, and within the sequence of novels that make up Bova's Grand Tour, the Moon is firmly located within that context.

Throughout his childhood, however, he was drawn to the stories of nautical adventures and shipwrecks shared by his first teacher and by the sailors who frequented the docks in Nantes. While studying in Paris, Verne befriended the son of the well-known novelist Alexandre Dumas.